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Blurred Lines
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The man who’d make you miserable…
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He said, she thought…
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The Cracked Screen
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June’s Reading List
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Be careful what you wish for
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In between the pages in May
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Sew special
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April reads
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Winding the bobbin up

Blurred Lines

But it was getting harder, by the day, to get past his ‘phone situation – physically and psychologically. It was like the Great Wall of China obstructing any exploration of their chemistry. The way she saw it; if he didn’t take care of his ‘phone, what were the chances that he’d take care of her in a relationship? Yes, her thinking was flawed but she couldn’t help herself. In her opinion, the way a man treated some of the things in his life – his car, his devices – signalled his attitude towards his woman.

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The man who’d make you miserable…

Esohe saw none of it. Folarin was suave, cocky with a confidence level bordering dangerously at an arrogant angle. Critical of some of Esohe’s moves, ideas, choices, and even friends, and she let him change her. A power dresser with a wardrobe his job in a multinational funded easily. At 5 ‘8’, he once confessed to Esohe that he wasn’t exactly at the height he would have preferred but would make do with it anyway. His suits moulded his lanky frame, exuding just the right amount of importance and ego he needed to exert authority and respect. His ebony head was almost always clean shaven, a smooth flow into an equally shaven face, free of any additional strand of hair either save for his eyebrows above a pair of brooding, deep set eyes and sensual, slightly full lips. He was all about his image, outward appearance, and Esohe, distractingly pretty and easy to manipulate trophy wife was perfect for his external impression on the world. He said the right things; he made the right moves, grand gestures on special days that rocked her world. Esohe was totally smitten. He was her knight in shining armour. The one.

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He said, she thought…

If he didn’t score high in her potentials’ list, then why the heck did her foolish heart just skip a beat at the mere sound of his voice?! She thought as she swiftly hurried into the compound of TFC which was right in front of her, escaping the traffic noise and finding some semblance of calm beneath the awning at the entrance of the fast food place.

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The Cracked Screen

No points for telling he was a tall specimen of a man. 6’1 or 6’2 judging from his endless limbs extended in front of him. A goatee or days’ old beard darkened his well-defined chin, a rather charming addition to his handsome face of warm, brown – coloured, twinkling eyes and thin lips that curved often into a grin or a mischievous smile. No wedding band. Nice casual dressing – his pair of black and neon Nike converse, the baggy blue jeans underneath a form – fitting, plain, black T-shirt and a black baseball cap. His patient interaction with the children.

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June’s Reading List

Fat Chance – Nick SpaldingI began the month on a humourous footing. Nick Spalding’s book was recommended by a friend and well worth the time and laughter it evoked. Funny, well written, engaging and relatable. After this novel, I searched and acquired more of his work (about five of them) for further laughs the British humour and writing style I want around me. The Art of Witty Banter – Patrick KingI am uncertain how this volume made its way into my unread collection but I’d likely say the same of others in there as well. It’s all in the need to read widely and not confine my mind to just a type. And because I believe few books are a waste of my precious time, I found this rather enlightening and broadening my scope on the fine art of starting, sustaining and prolonging conversations with friends and strangers alike. The suggestions were endless and common place, some of which rang familiar too (I use that!). Bullseye – James Patterson. And I’m still on this author – my third of his books in two months. However, he wrote this in collaboration with someone else. No problem at all. Still interesting detective plot that kept me turning the pages until the end. I have one more (or is it two now?) of his novels. Lifelong Writing Habit – Chris Fox.This trade book of the month was like listening to a scratched CD; almost all the suggestions therein I had come across before. The bottom line was to write every which I still struggle to achieve years after reading On Writing and other books about building a writing routine. I write regularly but everyday writing? I’m still working hard at it and hope this book would do the magic. Why? What was different about this one? I did all the exercises enclosed in it and will begin the journey to building the routine of everyday writing tomorrow – July 1. Check me out on July 21; it takes three weeks to develop a habit, doesn’t it?

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Sew special

The silence this time was as heavy as a typical Lagos morning rush hour traffic; Zibby’s face was a Kodak- worthy moment. ‘But …but both of you…’ She spluttered, when she finally found her voice but not the right words. Like a complicated bank vault lock, things began to fall into place, the puzzle pieces fitting perfectly. Her mind spun. Olumide’s words, his subtle actions…

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April reads

Three months after a sterling start to my reading journey this year, I fell grossly shy of my target just at the end of the first quarter.Two books. I read two books in April. I am almost too ashamed to admit it.How did this happen? Who – or what – is to blame for this catastrophe? Like the American society, someone/ something has to be held responsible for any shortfall.  In this case, a novella & its all- consuming plot – is the cause. A story I’ve been going at since March that has ballooned out of proportion, taken different, delicious directions and have clocked in more writing time in a month than in the last six – A path to thread. I abandoned reading most of the time in favour of furious, relentless, scribbling as my thoughts fell over one another with ideas.  So there. Only two books this month. The Faraway Nearby by Rebecca Solnit which didn’t quite turn out to be the trade book I had thought it would be, and my very first James Patterson novel, Run for your life. Both were interesting, entertaining reads; authors I won’t forget in a hurry.

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