Tag - novels

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June’s Reading List
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Books in January
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2018: In between the pages
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G.L.i.B-bed: Bingeing on Archer
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G.L.i.B – bed: Tell Tale
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G.L.i.B-bed: A week with Chuma Nwokolo Jnr

June’s Reading List

Fat Chance – Nick SpaldingI began the month on a humourous footing. Nick Spalding’s book was recommended by a friend and well worth the time and laughter it evoked. Funny, well written, engaging and relatable. After this novel, I searched and acquired more of his work (about five of them) for further laughs the British humour and writing style I want around me. The Art of Witty Banter – Patrick KingI am uncertain how this volume made its way into my unread collection but I’d likely say the same of others in there as well. It’s all in the need to read widely and not confine my mind to just a type. And because I believe few books are a waste of my precious time, I found this rather enlightening and broadening my scope on the fine art of starting, sustaining and prolonging conversations with friends and strangers alike. The suggestions were endless and common place, some of which rang familiar too (I use that!). Bullseye – James Patterson. And I’m still on this author – my third of his books in two months. However, he wrote this in collaboration with someone else. No problem at all. Still interesting detective plot that kept me turning the pages until the end. I have one more (or is it two now?) of his novels. Lifelong Writing Habit – Chris Fox.This trade book of the month was like listening to a scratched CD; almost all the suggestions therein I had come across before. The bottom line was to write every which I still struggle to achieve years after reading On Writing and other books about building a writing routine. I write regularly but everyday writing? I’m still working hard at it and hope this book would do the magic. Why? What was different about this one? I did all the exercises enclosed in it and will begin the journey to building the routine of everyday writing tomorrow – July 1. Check me out on July 21; it takes three weeks to develop a habit, doesn’t it?

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2018: In between the pages

Every knowledge and wisdom, direction and inspiration I garnered from all those books were distilled into my writings accordingly. And since you consumed all those words, every blessed Sunday, put together by someone who consumed some other well-put together words, then…well, you get my drift. Surely our connection, interaction should count for something, shouldn’t it?

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G.L.i.B – bed: Tell Tale

There’s nothing better than a Jeffrey Archer novel as a worthy companion. And to think I wasn’t much of a fan of his work in my budding, voracious reading years.  Don’t get me wrong; I did devour some of his books – A Quiver Full of Arrows, The Fourth Estate, False Impression, etc. However, it was a rare occasion to seek after them with the same passion and fervor I would normally for Sydney Sheldon’s work. Whenever I read them (Jeffrey Archer’s), they usually happened by chance and through no intentional effort on my part. Not until The Clifton Chronicles and I crossed paths. Now I’m quick to suggest him at  the slightest conversation about good reads and authors. Tell Tale was another enthralling read – all 14 short stories, and not enough of them in my opinion – that I finished in less than 12 hours, grudgingly laying it aside when there were more important tasks to tackle namely professional work and house chores. It was classic Jeffrey Archer with a surprising bonus at the end, four chapters of his new book – Heads You Win – which is due out in November 2018. I can’t wait!  

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G.L.i.B-bed: A week with Chuma Nwokolo Jnr

There’s no art to find the mind’s construction in the face. Ironically, I hadn’t set my eyes on Chuma Nwokolo Jnr when I happened upon some scribblings of his on Facebook last year. Using photos taken from different activities (panel discussions, informal gatherings, etc) of the recently concluded Ake LitFest, he generated seemingly appropriate dialogue for each. Dialogue which resulted in hilarious, uncivilized, out-of-control guffaws. More than enough to google the creator and find out about him. Nothing prepares you for the unassuming, gentle-looking, friendly visage which confronts you in all his images. It is certainly not what you’d expect from one who has honed the comedic writing style to seamless perfection. His face gives nothing away; you never see it coming. The first book I read, Diary of a Dead Nigerian, is a short one. A short read. But one I’m certainly not wistful about. Divided into three parts – one for each protagonist – it is an amusing tale of three men, a father and his two sons. Chuma Nwokolo beautifully captures the events preceding their deaths and encompassing their lives as well. The choice of words, their actions and streams of consciousness set each character apart and often left me in stitches. Nonsense and tenpence from the father, this is war from his second son and, the proper English Language from the first and writer son of the family were distinctions that remained with me long after I turned the last page of the book. Funny how the writer character only begins his own diary after reading his brother’s and his father’s accounts. Diary of a Dead Nigerian explores family ties and betrayal, cultural peculiarities, man’s greed and inherent selfishness and wickedness, advanced fee fraud, the curse of poverty and riches, as well as a political undertone pervading through the pages of the book, all woven into a humourous plot with sober consequences.  A brief read but a thoroughly pleasurable one. The Ghost of Sani Abacha, the second book, is a collection of short stories. Since I had just finished a previous paperback of his, my expectations”more

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